Sculpting

Joe Coates

Joe Coates

I learned to love working with my hands from my father, a pilot, who was also an accomplished mechanic and woodworker.  I was introduced to welding as a teenager by the aircraft mechanics at the local airport.  Initially, I welded to build and repair cars, but quickly became enamored with the amazing strength and beauty of welded metal structures and started welding for the sheer joy of the creative process. 

Kimberly Foytlin

Kimberly Foytlin

Growing up in Durham was an adventure. There was a quality to it that you could not find in any other city. It had a starving artist charm that drew you in and kept you here, no matter how hard the lifestyle could be. This place challenged me to become an artist and represent the growing culture that Durham is quickly creating for itself. After leaving Durham for a few years to attend East Carolina University and acquire my BFA in sculpture it wasn’t hard to make the decision to return to my hometown.

Hermes Illana

Hermes Illana

I am still trying to define the word ‘artist’ or even to accept the title for myself. In my work I just try to give a different meaning and function to objects that I find. I work mainly with recycled metal and wood. I also experiment with a medium that I call photographic sculpture, which challenges the boundaries of 2D photography. 

Tripp Jarvis

I was an artist at the age of five, when I started copying the Sunday Comics in my hometown of Holly Springs, North Carolina. I followed my passion for art through school and completed an art degree at East Carolina University. A simple soapstone carving made me fall in love with the ability to shape one of the hardest materials on Earth with my own hands; I knew I would be a sculptor.